After failed attempts at Spuntino and Polpetto, the day finally came that I managed to drag my other half to the 4th and most recent of Russell Norman’s London enterprises. 

On a rainy Friday evening, after experiencing the surgery-like atmosphere of the Apple Store ‘Genius bar’, we decided to check out the Maiden Lane establishment. Apart from the roadworks afflicting yet another London street, Da Polpo looked lovely from the outside. Green wooden frame, half window white curtains, much like the Italian trattorias (and trendy restaurants) back home. 
And amazingly, as we walked in, they even had a table for us. It actually was only half full. The venue is nice, I found it quite interestingly furnished, half shabby chic half trendy foodie type world. The menus are printed on brown paper table mats, which is also nice and kind of rustic, and the glasses are tumblers. I had read fellow bloggers’ reviews critising these tumblers but if Norman is aiming at recreating a family trattoria, then the tumblers are spot on, even if they are a posher and smaller version than your average Italian trattoria’s. 

We ordered two glasses of white wine (Cortese Volpi) and some individual dishes. Amongst the cicchetti (‘bites of food’ in Veneto) we ordered two arancini and two croquettes. I found the Potato and Parmesan croquettes quite nice.. Soft, and well flavoured but comparable to any local restaurant in Napoli. The arancini however were very disappointing. No salt at all, and an overpowering herby aroma. Again, in Napoli, you would find much better version in any  restaurant (I had some great ones last month at Don Giovanni, in Vomero area).

 

After these, the ‘pizzetta‘ arrived. In my mind, I had pictured what we call pizzette: doughy, fluffy fried pizzette with toppings and that was what I was kind of expecting. Instead, what I got was a smaller version on Pizza Express’ La Reine. I have not been in a Pizza Express in ages, but a crispy thin pizza base topped with spinach, Parmesan and a soft egg is what I remember it like. Forgettable. 

Next the best two dishes of the night. Lamb and mint meatballs felt light and minty and my Chickpeas ricotta and spinach polpette were good, with slightly crunchy chickpeas and melting cheese. Yet I found the sauce (same for both) quite heavy and not particularly original. We were served three slices of bread but only when we had finished the meatballs!

The service was attentive, fast and friendly so nothing to complain there. 

Frankly, we were disappointed by Da Polpo. Maybe we should have tried more dishes. Maybe we should go back to Polpo and try that one. Maybe I’m too focused on Italian traditional food. This unfortunately just seemed a pretentious attempt without any real soul. 

I cannot help but thinking that in Southern Italy you can still eat a proper, simple meal with authentic flavours for a bunch of euros.

Even if the wine comes in common tumblers…


4 Comments

luciana squadrilli · June 28, 2011 at 8:22 pm

mmmm….what a shame! We should try the “simple” place my friend asked me to visit for the guide…delikatessen or something like that….can’t remember the name ooops!

federilli · July 5, 2011 at 10:31 pm

You dont remember the name? E’ un po’ vago Delikatessen.. tell me tell me!

right_writes · July 16, 2011 at 6:30 am

federilli:

Saw your comment regarding Spuntino on Kang’s “London Eater”… Couldn’t agree more, so followed your link here… Again, I have been here, Da Polpo about a month ago, and have a similar opinion to yours… underwhelming… and I have scant knowledge of provincial Italian eateries…

Speaking of pizza, earlier this week, I went to Franco Manca in Brixton Market… Now that would pass my “Croydon” test… Briefly, if you take an eatery away from its fashionable location, lock stock and barrel, and plant it somewhere suburban… Would it survive?

Spuntino/Da Polpo wouldn’t… Franco Manca would thrive!

federilli · July 16, 2011 at 2:10 pm

right_writes thanks for your comment. I havent tried Manca yet but I hear from neapolitan opinion that it is very good. I agree with you/ Manca, like many other establishments, has made his reputation based on good quality food. Polpo, I fear, it’s mainly about the buzz and the location (trendy soho, fashionable covent garden… hoxton next?).

I might try Spuntino, just because it has some different, more original dishes than Da Polpo, but now I really do not expect much…!

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